Results tagged ‘ Carlos Delgado ’

Leftovers from Marlins media luncheon

This offseason, the Marlins changed how they do business.

For the first time in more than five years, the organization offered several players multiyear contracts.

With their new stadium opening in 2012, revenues project to rise. Most likely, so will the team payroll, which could be about $58 million by Opening Day.

In the offseason, Ricky Nolasco signed a three-year, $26.5 million contract. Free agent catcher John Buck signed for three years at $17.94 million, while reliever Randy Choate secured a two-year, $2.5 million deal.

Previously, the last big named free agent Florida signed to a multiyear deal was Carlos Delgado in 2005.

Marlins owner Jeffrey Loria said on Monday at the annual media luncheon at the Intercontinental Hotel in Miami that players must show they’re worthy of multiyear contracts.

“Ricky showed me a tremendous amount of development and maturity, and a work ethic,” Loria said.

Loria talked with Marlins president of baseball operations Larry Beinfest about offering a long-term contract to Nolasco, and a deal was reached in December.

“I told Larry, ‘We have to lock him up and take care of him.’ And we did,” Loria said. “Going into the new stadium, it will give us further opportunity to do stuff with players, but they have to show the manager and the general manager and all of us that they’ve earned it. It just isn’t something that you hand out. You earn it.”

Some other topics touched on at the luncheon:

* Slugger Mike Stanton, who turned 21 in November, has added about eight pounds since the end of last season. A towering presence, Stanton said he is at 250-pounds. When asked if it was muscle, Stanton joked: “Fat.” That responsde brought laughter because he is in terrific shape.

* Stanton talking about Twitter: “It’s fun to interact with our fans, and even people who aren’t our fans. To see what they have to say. It’s fun.”

* With 100 MLB games under his belt, Stanton projects to bat cleanup in his first full big league season.

“You either can handle it or you can’t,” Beinfest said. “Either you’re Miguel Cabrera and you can handle it, or you are Mike Stanton and you can handle it. His ability is off the charts, and he’s going to be fine. There are going to be some days when he’s going to look like a 21-year-old without a lot of big league experience. But he is a special talent.”

* Hanley Ramirez will be expected to take on more of a leadership role. “He will,” Loria said. “I think that is also a matter of maturity and recognizing who you are. Hanley is a bright young man. He’s only 27. Maturing takes a little while.”

Loria spoke with Ramirez a couple of months ago, and he feels the 27-year-old shortstop is primed to bounce back in 2011.

“He’s as excited as ever,” Loria said. “I said to him, ‘Hanley, you’ve won a batting championship. You’ve won the Rookie of the Year. It’s time to be what they call the MVP.’ He said he got the picture.

“I’m not saying he’s going to be the MVP, but he has the ability to do whatever Hanley wants. I love him. There is no secret about that. I think he’s going to come in here and do what he needs to do.”

* You can put to rest any speculation of Ramirez eventually moving to another position. The Marlins have no intentions of playing the three-time All-Star anywhere other than shortstop. “He’s there,” Beinfest said. “And I hope he’s there for a long time. I think defensively, he’s improved over the years. There are some things that he can clean up too. But I don’t see anything major with him.”

– Joe Frisaro

 

Marlins payroll projects at $58 million

The Marlins aren’t waiting until moving into their new ballpark to bump up payroll.

After taking care of all their arbitration business on Tuesday, the Marlins’ have already allocated more than $52 million on 13 players. By the time their 25-man roster is completed, their Opening Day number projects to be about $58 million.

It’s the franchise’s highest payroll since it opened 2005 with a $60.4 million figure. That squad featured Carlos Delgado, Mike Lowell, Luis Castillo, Josh Beckett, Dontrelle Willis, Paul Lo Duca and Juan Pierre.

In 2010, the Marlins’ payroll to start the season was $47.4 million, according to Cot’s Baseball Contracts.

Hanley Ramirez will be the highest paid player on the team with a base salary of $11 million. Josh Johnson will be making $7.75 million, while Javier Vazquez is signed for $7 million, and Ricky Nolasco is set to earn $6 million.

Payroll increases are expected over the next few seasons, after the team moves into their new retractable-roof ballpark, which is set to open in 2012.

– Joe Frisaro

 

Uggla on brink of 100 RBIs

Dan Uggla is on the brink of joining an exclusive Marlins’ club.

With his next RBI, he will place himself on the franchise’s 100 RBI list. In their history, the benchmark has been reached 14 times.

Uggla1z2.jpgUggla has been stuck on 99 since his run-scoring single in the seventh inning last Thursday at Milwaukee. He has gone four games without driving in a run heading into Tuesday night at Atlanta.

The 99 RBIs by Uggla are the most of any National League second baseman. Robinson Cano of the Yankees has 105, which tops all MLB second basemen.

Uggla is having a career season across the board, and he’s already topped his season best for RBIs. Previously it was 92 in 2008.

Preston Wilson holds the franchise record with 121, posted in 2000. A year ago, Hanley Ramirez (106) and Jorge Cantu (100) reached the century mark.

Florida’s season RBI leaders:

* Preston Wilson, 121, 2000
* Gary Sheffield, 120, 1996
* Miguel Cabrera, 119, 2007
* Miguel Cabrera, 116, 2005
* Moises Alou, 115, 1997
* Carlos Delgado, 115, 2005
* Miguel Cabrera, 114, 2006
* Miguel Cabrera, 112, 2004
* Hanley Ramirez, 106, 2009
* Jeff Conine, 105, 1995
* Mike Lowell, 105, 2003
* Cliff Floyd, 103, 2001
* Jorge Cantu, 100, 2009
* Mike Lowell, 100, 2001
* Dan Uggla, 99, 2010

– Joe Frisaro

Hanley on brink of 100

Even though Hanley Ramirez didn’t get a hit in the Marlins’ 11-3 win on Saturday night against the Nationals, the All-Star shortstop did drive in a run with a sacrifice fly.

Now with 99 on the season, Ramirez is on the brink of his first 100 RBI campaign.

In his first three seasons, Ramirez was primarily a leadoff hitter, and he established franchise records for runs scored in a season with 125, which he did in 2007-08. He’s hit third this year.

Previously, his RBI high was 81 in 2007.

Ramirez is having an MVP-caliber season, although the frontrunner for the award is St. Louis’ Albert Pujols.

Still, Ramirez is enjoying a remarkable season, and worthy of serious MVP consideration. Now he’s shown he can be a big-time run producer batting in the third spot.

The last Marlin to reach 100 RBIs was Miguel Cabrera, who posted 119 in 2007.

Here’s Florida’s all-time 100 RBI leaders:

121 Preston Wilson 2000

120 Gary Sheffield 1996

119 Miguel Cabrera 2007

116 Miguel Cabrera 2005

115 Carlos Delgado 2005

115 Moises Alou 1997

114 Miguel Cabrera 2006

112 Miguel Cabrera 2004

105 Mike Lowell 2003

105 Jeff Conine 1995

– Joe Frisaro

 

 

 

Bonifacio draws balk

Another example of how Emilio Bonifacio hurts a defense? Balks.

When Bonifacio singled to open the sixth inning off New York’s Sean Green, he put the Mets on guard. Green threw over a couple of times to first baseman Carlos Delgado. Without even attempting a steal, Green balked, which automatically advanced Boni to second.

Bonifacio went to third on Hanley Ramirez’s infield single. Jorge Cantu singled Boni home. On the pitch Cantu hit to left field, Bonifacio faked as if he was going to race home.

– Joe Frisaro

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