Archive for the ‘ Uncategorized ’ Category

Stanton sends out letter to fans

MIAMI — Giancarlo Stanton has given the Marlins a long-term commitment, and on Thursday, the two-time All-Star sent out a letter of thanks to season ticket holders.

MM_Letter#2_Stanton

Give Miami Day event underway

MIAMI — The Miami Marlins front office will shut down on Thursday to participate in the fifth annual Marlins Ayudan Day of Service and Philanthropy. Beginning at 9 a.m. on the West Plaza at Marlins Park, Marlins employees will be split into nine groups consisting of 18 employees.

#GiveMiamiDay! Today is Miami’s biggest day of giving and philanthropy of the year! Last year, Miami raised $3.2 million! Pretty incredible!

Remember to give “In Honor” of Jackie Robinson’s 9 Values: Courage, Determination, Teamwork, Persistence, Integrity, Citizenship, Justice, Commitment and Excellence

Steps:

1. Go to GiveMiamiDay.org

2. Select the charity you want to give to! Any charity you like!

3. Complete the form but be sure to enter your choice under the “In honor of…” field.

LaRoche, Shields, ballpark fences and more

MIAMI — Giancarlo Stanton is signed, sealed and delivered for 13 years at $325 million. What’s next?

Here’s what I’ve learned is on tap. The Marlins have serious interest in Adam LaRoche and James Shields remains on the club’s radar. The Miami Herald reported Miami has a two-year, $20 million offer on the table for the veteran first baseman. MLB.com has confirmed interest.

A power bat to protect Stanton is a high priority. LaRoche would fit the bill, adding playoff experience, as well as the fact he hits from the left side.

A high-end starting pitcher is also a priority. Shields, obviously, would bring plenty of experience to a young rotation that will be without Jose Fernandez for much of the first half.

Worth noting

* The dimensions at spacious Marlins Park were brought up in the Stanton negotiations. Nothing was written into the megadeal guaranteeing the fences will be moved in. But the Marlins are open to doing so over the next few years. The organization is studying the impact of the park. It’s not just a concern for Stanton, who obviously has the power to clear the fences as is.

But if the team feels the building is causing its players to constantly change their approaches, then it could lead to making changes. The concern is the Miami batters will have one approach at home and another on the road.

Another factor is the pitching. If the Marlins’ pitchers are tending to be much better at home than on the road, it may have something to do with them playing to the big park, challenging hitters. Mistakes that are rewarded at home could be damaging hits away. In other words, pitchers may not be as sharp hitting the corners routinely because they get away with mistakes at home.

* The Marlins have no interest in Pablo Sandoval.

* Miami may seek to trade prospects for a controllable starting pitcher, much like their Jarred Cosart deal with the Astros. Aside from Tyler Kolek, their No. 1 pick this year, the club is open to trading pretty much any prospect.

* Jarrod Saltalamacchia, in his second year of a three-year deal, is not a trade candidate.

* Other clubs are inquiring about J.T. Realmuto, but Miami isn’t interested in trading their catcher of the future.

Joe Frisaro

Is UM-FSU only reason Stanton is in town?

MIAMI — College football was on Giancarlo Stanton’s mind Saturday, as the Marlins’ slugger attended the Florida State-University of Miami game at Sun Life Stadium.

Pregame, Stanton was on the sidelines, interacting and posing for pictures.

But with a record-setting contract offer on the table, you have to figure Stanton’s visit to South Florida isn’t all about The U. Is this also a business trip?

From all indications, negotiations between the Stanton and the Marlins are winding down. The two sides reportedly are closing in on a 13-year, $325 million extension that will include an opt-out clause and a no-trade clause.

Nothing has changed over the last few days to indicate either side is about to fumble away the deal. In fact, there is growing speculation that an announcement will come sometime this week. If so, Stanton already is in town.

Stanton isn’t the Marlins’ only order of business this offseason, but he is priority No. 1. This much we do know, the club also is considering extending some other young core players, like Christian Yelich, Adeiny Hechavarria and Marcell Ozuna. There is even an outside chance they will seek a long-term deal with Jose Fernandez.

For now, all those talks have been pushed aside. Signing Stanton is in the forefront, and all other talks are on hold.

Also unclear is the breakdown of Stanton’s contract. The years and figures have changed in recent days. When the story broke on Thursday that Miami was making a record-setting offer, the initial framework was said to be at least 10 years and $300 million. Then word came it was 12 years at $320 million. Now, the latest is 13 years, $325 million.

From what I’ve heard, the initial figure the Marlins were danging was 12 years, $300 million with opt-out and no-trade clauses. The terms may have indeed changed as the negotiations heated up.

Whether it is $300 million or $325 million, the dollar amount would surpass Miguel Cabrera’s $292 million as the richest for a professional athlete.

There also is a report Stanton can opt out after the fifth year, or 2019.

In early October, the Marlins were thinking of a deal in the five or six year range with a salary similar to Mike Trout’s six-year, $144.5 million contract.

The opt-out clause gives an opening for a shorter deal, but still one that would keep the 25-year-old Stanton in Miami until he is at least 30.

There’s been a lot of progress in the talks. Now it’s a matter of pushing the deal across the goal line.

Joe Frisaro

Could fences be attached to Stanton deal?

MIAMI — The numbers are staggering, and if finalized, would be historic. The latest is the Marlins are closing in on a benchmark contract extension with Giancarlo Stanton. The sides reportedly are nearing agreement on a 13-year, $325 million contract.

If accepted, Stanton would become the highest paid athlete ever, topping the $292 million extension Miguel Cabrera signed with the Tigers.

When the particulars are known, we’ll find out if there are strings attached, such as a no-trade clause or an opt-out provision.

Something else to look for is whether there is a stadium attached. Or more specifically, the fences at spacious Marlins Park.

Although Stanton won the National League home run crown with 37, he’s spoken out publicly in the past about just how spacious Miami’s retractable-roof building is. He’s advocated moving the fences in, not just to pad his numbers, but to reward hitters in general.

Already the Marlins are in unchartered waters. Quite frankly, the club was prepared to offer Stanton no more than five or six years at a figure that could have rivaled Mike Trout’s $144.5 million.

Now, the years being reported, and not refuted, are more than a decade, and the salary is north of $300 million.

For players, Marlins Park is a terrific place to play, and the fan experience is excellent. The downfall, at least to position players, is the field is way to spacious.

If the Marlins are committed to securing Stanton for the next 10 years, they will be locking up the game’s most feared power hitter. It would make sense for both sides to pull in the fences to give the slugger a better set off the 72-foot Home Run sculpture in center field.

An unanswered question is whether the stadium dimensions are part of the negotiations. Perhaps the fences were addressed, either directly as a clause to the contract, or just an assurance that they will be move in over time.

Stanton already has 154 career homers. If he stays for the next 10 years, he could become a historical player, reaching milestones, which inevitably would generate more interest and attention.

Also, having Stanton as their centerpiece also could attract other power hitters to want to be in Miami. If the ballpark is more hitter-friendly, Stanton could be the franchise’s best recruiter.

When the dust settles and exact salary figures are releases, we may also eventually see the wall that sports the 418 foot marker in center field pushed up a bit.

Joe Frisaro

Hernandez suffers abdominal injury

MIAMI — Marlins infielder Enrique Hernandez is expected to miss the remainder of the Winter League season due to a lower-abdominal strain.

Hernandez, who has been playing Winter Ball in Puerto Rico, felt discomfort during a morning workout on Tuesday. For now, he has been advised that he needs to rest.

Next week, Hernandez will be further examined by Marlins’ physicians in Miami. At that point, the team should have a better indication if Hernandez will be completely healthy when the Marlins begin Spring Training in February.

Hernandez is a candidate for Miami’s starting second base job. He also plays the outfield.

Miami acquired Hernandez from the Astros on July 31.

Joe Frisaro

Preliminary talk with Stanton underway

MIAMI — The Marlins have already engaged in preliminary contract talks with Giancarlo Stanton’s agent regarding a long-term contract.

No firm timeline is in place, but the organization is hopeful of eventually reaching an extension with their two-time All-Star right fielder.

“Our negotiations, we want to keep them private,” Marlins president of baseball operations Michael Hill said in a conference call on Wednesday afternoon. “We don’t want to negotiate this through the media. I will say that we’ve reached out to his representative and that negotiations are ongoing.”

Stanton, who led the National League in home runs with 37, is two seasons away from being eligible for free agency. The Marlins maintain they plan on keeping the slugger in 2015, with or without a long-term deal.

The club has made it clear it plans on building around Stanton, one of three National League MVP finalists.

In 2014, he made $6.5 million. The club hasn’t given any specifics regarding a long-term deal for Stanton. Most likely it will be in the five or six year range, averaging between $28 million to $30 million per season.

It is doubtful the club or Stanton would be seeking a 10-year deal in the $300 million range.

For now, preliminary conversations with Stanton’s agent, Joel Wolfe, are ongoing, and are expected to heat up around the General Managers Meetings next week.

“We haven’t given him a time line, and I don’t want to speculate that we would allow it to go on indefinitely,” Hill said. “But at some point, he either is going to be signed to a multi-year, or he will be signed to a one-year. We haven’t gotten to that yet. There is no deadline in place as far as the timing of thiings.”

The Marlins are planning to build around Stanton and a core of young players, who also are candidates for extensions. The team also is considering locking up left fielder Christian Yelich, center fielder Marcell Ozuna and shortstop Adeiny Hechavarria to multi-year deals this offseason.

None of the three are eligible for arbitration.

The Marlins haven’t publicly announced their payroll parameters. But it is believed to be in the $60 million range.

“We don’t get into specifics with our payroll,” Hill said. “But the one thing that we left our organizational meetings knowing is that we’re going to be able to do what we need to do. The plan is to retain all of our players, including the big right fielder, hopefully, and find a way to continue to upgrade the roster.’

Joe Frisaro

Marlins expected to pick up Mathis’ option

MIAMI — Before turning their attention to the free agent market next week, the Marlins have some internal business to resolve. Will they pick up the $1.5 million club option on catcher Jeff Mathis?

The answer is yes.

According to sources, the Marlins anticipate exercising Mathis’ option.

Mathis, 31, has impressed the organization with his ability to handle the pitching staff, as well as his defensive skills. In 2015, he once again is expected to back up Jarrod Saltalamacchia.

In 64 games last year, Mathis batted .200 with two homers and 12 RBIs. But his value is his defense, and ability to work with the staff.

The Marlins have a talented group of young pitchers, and retaining Mathis continues the continuity. He posted a .998 fielding percentage in 473 2/3 innings, and threw out 16 attempting to steal.

As an organization, the Marlins have some of their best catching depth in years. Saltalamacchia is entering his second season of a three-year deal, and Mathis will be back for his third season in Miami.

J.T. Realmuto is regarded as the catcher of the future, who could be a year or two away from becoming a regular.

The Marlins acquired Mathis in November of 2012 as part of their 12-player trade with the Blue Jays.

Joe Frisaro

Lucas claimed by Rangers, Valdespin to NoLa

MIAMI — Ed Lucas, dependable in a utility role the past two seasons in Miami, was claimed off waivers on Friday by the Rangers.

The Marlins also cleared out a second spot on their 40-man roster when infielder Jordany Valdespin was outrighted to Triple-A New Orleans.

Both utility players became expendable with the addition of Enrique Hernandez to the roster. Donovan Solano also could facture into a utility role if the Marlins bring in a regular second baseman this offseason.

Lucas, 32, appeared in 69 games and batted .251 with one home run and nine RBIs. In two seasons with Miami, he hit .255.

Lucas plays all four infield spots, as well as corner outfield. He also was an emergency catcher option, but never was needed in that role.

Valdespin, who turns 27 in December, saw action at second base with Miami, and he played some outfield down the stretch. A left-handed hitter, he batted .214 with three homers and 10 RBIs in 52 games.

Joe Frisaro

Marlins to show patience with Jose

MIAMI — Building up throwing from 30 feet to 45 feet, and upwards to 60, 90, 120 and beyond are the first steps in Jose Fernandez’s recovery from Tommy John surgery.

Getting back to being game-ready will be a slow, deliberate process. From all indications, Fernandez and the Marlins are prepared to be patient. No sense rushng anything, and risking a setback.

Fernandez understands he is likely looking at being back in 14 months, or around the All-Star Break. If he is back earlier, and pitching at a high level with no signs of discomfort, the better.

But in all likelihood, the best case scenario seems to be Miami having Fernandez for the second half of 2015. Even then, expect the club to be ready to handle with care.

Even at full strength, Fernandez will be closely monitored. Expect the Marlins to have him on limitations, meaning, he could be coming out of games around the fifth or sixth innings to start off.

The Marlins won’t look at Fernandez back on the mound as meaning he is prepared to throw 115 pitches and grind out eight innings. Chances are he will be on a pitch count and some sort of innings limit.

Understanding where they are with their 22-year-old ace, the Marlins’ top priority this offseason will be looking for a front-line starting pitcher. Sure, they could use a power bat, and will look to find one.

But make no mistake, this is a franchise that believes in building around starting pitching. They feel Henderson Alvarez can assume the role of ace, and that Jarred Cosart can be a solid No. 3. Nathan Eovaldi, Tom Koehler both logged more than 190 innings, an important statistic in their respective development. They are both in the rotation mix.

Still, the objective will be to find either an ace or No. 2-caliber starter to help bridge the gap until Fernandez returns.

If they can accomplish that, it will make it easier for Miami to use Fernandez economically.

Joe Frisaro

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 105 other followers