Manufacturing runs

When you strand 12 runs on base and lose 2-1, it magnifies the importance of situational hitting.

The Marlins endured a frustrating one-run loss on Friday night against the Giants at Land Shark Stadium.

Jorge Cantu was up with the bases loaded and two outs against hard-throwing Brian Wilson. Cantu grounded out to short.

Manager Fredi Gonzalez said the team constantly preaches the importance of situational hitting, but points out the opposing pitcher has a lot of say in how the game turns out.

“We talk about it all the time, putting the ball in play and all that stuff,” Gonzalez said. “We preach it in batting practice.”

Obviously, not all the results are going to pan out. You’re not always going to get that timely, two-out, walkoff hit.

Outfielder Cody Ross says it is tough to completely teach hitting in certain situations.

“In BP, we’ll sometimes work on situations,” Ross said. “Sometimes [hitting coach Jim] Presley will call out a situation with less than two outs — infield in or infield back. That’s what it comes to, working on situations. It’s really tough to work on. You have to put it in your mind when you get in those situations to do the best job that you can.”

Bottom line, Ross says, is finding a way.

“It’s a matter of getting it done,” he said. “That sometimes separates being a really good big leaguer and being an average big leaguer. It’s you thrive on situations when the game is on the line, and you get the job done.”

While the Marlins are coming off a 2-1 loss, the fact remains they still are generating their share of offense.

Heading into Saturday night, the Marlins were fourth of 16 National League teams in runs scored with 259.

The first four in runs scored in the NL are the Dodgers (300), Phillies (293), Rockies (266) and Marlins.

– Joe Frisaro

 

 

 

 

6 Comments

Time for a new hitting coach.

If you think Cantu was bad, did you see Uggla choke with the bases loaded the other night? The score was 9 to 5 by the way. Then the next time he hit a SOLO homer. What a clutch hitter. I have heard it said that Uggla can “carry a team”. A team should not rest on inconsistency.

Lindstrom should not have been taken out of this game. He is the closer…had 2 outs…and hadn’t allowed a run yet. The team was up 3. No other close in baseball wouuld have been taken out in that situation. Gotta stay with your closer there.

LISTEN TO ME I SAID IT IN APRIL , I’LL SAY IT AGAIN,JUST WHAT DOES THE HITTING COACH SEE THAT HE HASNT BEEN ABLE TO SEE.. IF CANTU STANDS UP MORE HE WILL HAVE THE ABILITY TO DRIVE THRU THE BALL MORE..UGGLA HAS TOO MUCH MOVEMENT IN THE BOX AND CODY NEEDS TO ELIMINATE THAT WAGGLE AT THE TOP OF HIS SWING THOSE 3 WILL MORE THAN CARRY THIS TEAM…

TO JKILL AND THE OTHER S..FOR THE RECORD,I HAE A RESUME OF PLAYING AND COACHING AMATEUR AND PRO BALL..ON ONE JFRISARO BLOG CANTU ,HIMSELF, MY FAV,ADMITS TO “MISSING MY PITCHES” AND AGAIN, I BELIEVE BY STANDING UP MORE AND WITH A SHORTERSTANCE,HE HAS A BETTER SHOT AT NOT MISSING THOSELOW PITCHES IN THE DIRT.ALSO BY BEING MORE UPRIGHT THOSE LOW PITCHES WILL BE CALLED BALLS.BY CROUCHING MORE THE PITCHER GETS THE BENEFIT OF A LOWPITCH..

I have been reading “The Einstein Factor” and in Chapter one, there is an interesting subchapter on ‘A Baseball Genius’, I knoe many sports use Sport psychologists to improve concentration and results, maybe the Marlins should try something like this:
From The Einstein Factor, by Win Wenger in Chapter one.
“If you play tennis your coach has probably told you a hundred times to ‘keep your eye on the ball.’ Most of us assume that this means we should ‘pay attention’ to the ball, but that is physically impossible. A tennis ball in fight will always outrun the speed of your conscious thought by about half a second, because it takes a tenth of a second for the image from your eye to reach your brain and another 400 milliseconds for you to form a conscious perception of the ball. If tennis players relied on paying attention, every ball would smack the fence before they could move their rackets.”

From Chapter One, Subchapter: A Baseball Genius
“ Some years ago, I visited a friend in Chicago. My friend’s son was trying out for the high school baseball team, but feared he wouldn’t make the cut because of his poor batting average. I worked with the boy for about an hour, employing many of the techniques that you will learn to use later in this book.
In the course of our session, the boy discovered that he had the greatest success when he imagined a tiny flyspeck on the baseball and aimed his bat at that flyspeck rather than at the ball itself. This flyspeck gave him just the extra focus he needed to connect with the ball.
It may seem a trivial insight, but its effect on the boy’s game was astonishing. In baseball, a .250 to .300 batting average is considered quite good. But during the first ten games of the season, this boy batted .800! He not only made the team, but went on to be named the MVP for both the team and the league for that year.
In a single, one-hour session, we succeeded in indentifying a technique that made this boy a baseball genius. But the most surprising discovery was yet to come. I did not see this boy again until several years later. He was still p[laying baseball, and he clearly remembered our one-hour session as having marked the turning point in his athletic career.
But the boy had entirely forgotten the details of what he had learned during our session. He remembered nothing about the flyspeck and no longer consciously envisioned it when striking the ball. Indeed, he was a mystified as his teammates as to just how he had become such a great batter so quickly.”

I wonder if the batting coach of the Tampa Bay Rays has read this book and incorporated it into his special batting practice for his team for an hour every day? It would sure explain the excellence in the teams hitting averages or maybe he has another magic system.

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